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Skier en hors-piste – Quelques conseils de pro | Val d’Isère

Skier en hors-piste – Quelques conseils de pro | Val d’Isère


Hi everyone! We are in Val d’Isère. I am with Laurent Valbert who’s a meteorologist and snow expert, and today, he will tell us about his job. Météo France (French Forecast) is in charge of editing the avalanche risk review for the overall Savoie mountains, including Tarentaise. Therefore, we are always in touch with the resort ski patrol who conduct meteorological and snow surveys everyday for us to edit this avalanche risk review. Right now, the ski patrol is writing down everything on paper, they will copy everything into the computer database allowing us to get a graph. Then I will study this graph. They will also study this graph for the local avalanche risk review. For my part, I will study this graph and compare it with all the other ski resort graphs and I will edit an avalanche risk review for the overall Tarentaise mountains. Before starting on a off-piste route, it is necessary to keep informed on the weather forecast with the weather forecast review. But also, you’ll need to keep informed on the snow conditions, and this is what the avalanche risk review is made for, and available everyday at 4PM, for the Tarentaise mountains only. You can freely access to this review on Météo France’s website, but also on the Météo France and Météo Ski apps. After meeting Laurent, we are on our way to meet Henry who’s a off-piste ski instructor and an avalanche risk specialist. Hello Henry! Hi Bianca! How are you doing? I’m well, thank you. it’s a pleasure to meet you today! I was looking forward to this meeting. So, what’s bringing you here today? Today I wanted to talk to you about off-piste skiing, about this amazing playground with have here in Val d’Isère, and also about how to enjoy safely Val d’Isère off-piste skiing domain which is something we don’t see everywhere. I’m usually focusing on three essential topics: First, knowing where the secured area starts it’s limits, allowing use to be aware of our responsabilities for ourselves. Considering the risk reduction factors is keeping in mind that accidents mostly happen when we set a goal, when we are determined to walk somewhere to ride down the hill. But we don’t take into account the signs such as the recent activity on the mountain or even the avalanche risk review published by Météo France for example. Could you also tell us more about the vigilance aspects? Sure, I usually have a framework regarding the risk reduction and I tried to make it simple so that people can apply it It starts with the easy questions: “Can we go? Is it safe?” And the answer is: “It’s all up to you…” “Where and when are you going?” This is the decition-making. “How do you intend to go up there and to ride down?” This is the risk reduction process, if we decided to go outside of the secured area, where the hills are steep enough to trigger an avalanche And the third aspect is to have the proper safety equipment: ARVA, shovel and probe. Often, my clients or my friends tell me “Come on, let’s go Henry!” And this is exactly when it’s difficult to so say “no” and it can be dangerous. It’s always easier to say “yes”, but we should sometimes say “no” instead. This is the group emulation we are all together, with our friends, we just wanna ride, But instead we must to listen to everyone, ask ourselves how are we feeling, what’s our level of practice. Indeed, everything you are saying is very wise Bianca This is why I insist on “Safety is freedom”! The safety allows you to explore freely the mountain, and helps us to better enjoy a ski area like the one we have in Val d’Isère. Thank you very much Henry for your time.

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