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SCUBA Diving

SCUBA Diving


Rob: Well first thing is, the clarity of
the mine pits… these mine pits were active in nineteen seventy one – they were
still mining them – so all the water you see in the background is ground water that has seeped into here since nineteen
seventy one. All this water was pumped out to the
Mississippi which is six miles away so the clarity of the water is the major factor. Brent: Yeah, just the structure down there too
is fabulous. So you’ll have vertical walls and then you’ll have big dead spots, so it’s a whole diverse, rather than natural lakes where you
just get a lot of weeds, and forty feet is deep for a natural lake, but here it’s real deep down there. Rob: The other factor is that these pits were built in roads, as steps, as they went down. So when the silt starts at the top, the silt actually filters down to the bottom, so
that is what gives it its clarity, instead of a lake where you have a twenty foot or thirty
foot bottom that silt ends up there. Well, this ends up
at two hundred eighty five feet. Typically on a dive, today on our dive
we got in the water right away and there was a northern, about a thirty
six-inch northern that followed us for a long distance… we swam over to a beaver cutting, or an old beaver home and this
beaver home it actually starts at about twenty five-foot goes up to the
surface so it’s huge… and it’s an active beaver lodge so there
are beavers that are living in it, sunfish, crappies, large mouth bass, northerns, plenty of them, so you can
get just about wall diving, structure diving, tree diving… looking for fish… so I mean it’s all
here.

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