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RADaptive

RADaptive


NARRATOR: These
are the stories– MAN: There is a
foundation out there that helps you get back into it. NARRATOR: –of organizations
making a difference– MAN: What really limits
our ability to do something is people’s imagination. NARRATOR: –and empowering
others across Canada– MAN: When I get into that
sledge, I’m free, man. I’m playing hockey. WOMAN: It’s a
great organization, and it’s worth supporting. NARRATOR: In Our Community. JEFF SCOTT: My
name is Jeff Scott, and I grew up in the mountains. NARRATOR: Jeff is an athlete
and the executive director of the Live it
Love it Foundation. JEFF SCOTT: Every
weekend in the wintertime for as long as I can remember
we were scanner or boarding, and that was just
what we were doing. MAN: [inaudible] LINDSAY GERICKE: My
name’s Lindsay Gericke. JEFF SCOTT: Lindsay is
Jeff’s sister, who volunteers at the RADaptive Sit Ski Camp. LINDSAY GERICKE: We
spent a lot of our time together in Smithers on
the ski hill growing up. We kind of grew up doing it with
our parents and as a family, but then we made friends and
started doing it on our own. And we would take off
early on the weekends just to get to the ski hill. JEFF SCOTT: After
my accident, I knew that I had to find a way
to retain the mountains. In 2011, I was
going through rehab, and Izzy Lynch came
to me and said, I want to start this foundation. The Live it Love it Foundation
is a non-profit organization, and we work to
empower individuals. The big mountain world is
a bit of a new frontier for adaptive skiing. There is no adaptive category
for big mountain competition. We’re working
towards building one. This year we’ve got the
RADaptive Camp going on in Revelstoke. Today we’ve got a
radio interview. MAN: Let’s start right off
with, what is adaptive sport? JEFF SCOTT: You
think of a sport, and there’s an adaptive
alternative for it. Me, personally, I’m a big
fan of getting back skiing. Skiing has been a
big part of my life. I’m a C5, 6 quadriplegic,
so I broke my neck. So I don’t have much muscle
function below my shoulders, and I don’t have good hands. So I’m on a bi ski. I’ve actually got a
handlebar out behind me that someone holds on to. So I actually ski with someone. It feels like I’m a
kid again, and I’m just back at the sliding
hill with my friends falling down on the GT. Very responsive to any
kind of input I give, so it allows me
to initiate turns. I’m low to the ground. I’m dragging my hands in
my turns and going fast. MAN: Jeff, thanks
for taking the time. If you want to learn more, you
can go to liveitloveit.org. You can find them on Facebook. Jeff, thanks for taking
the time to give me a chat. JEFF SCOTT: Just got word that
our first athlete has arrived in Revelstoke up at
the resort, so we’re going to go join him
on the beautiful patio. We sit here with a giant. NARRATOR: Don Nesbitt is
an OG in the skateboarding, snowboarding, and
action sports world. In other words, he’s been
around since the beginning. Don has a YouTube channel where
he posts some of the craziest sit ski riding you’ll see in
gorgeous mountain settings– breathtaking footage
that really shows you what’s possible on a sit ski. Don, Jeff, and other
members of the crew meet at a pub in Revelstoke for
a bingo fundraiser the night before the camp begins. JEFF SCOTT: We’ve got a small
group of athletes that charge. We’ve got Cam Lochhead here,
last year’s big mountain adaptive contest winner. CAM LOCHHEAD:
First mountain Jeff through a few friends of mine
through the ski racing scene. I skied my whole younger
years up until 17. I got in a pretty
bad car accident. NARRATOR: Cam’s
sister, Megan Lochhead, joins the crew as a volunteer
at this year’s camp. MEGHAN LOCHHEAD:
The first thing he did was literally get rid of
all of his sports equipment. I think it just
hurt him too much. It was just too
emotionally hard to have. CAM LOCHHEAD: It took
me a really long time to get back to the mountains. I didn’t think that a whole
lot was possible on a sit ski. I saw a video that
Solomon shot [inaudible].. And it just blew me away. I couldn’t believe
what was actually possible in that thing. MEGHAN LOCHHEAD: I
think it wasn’t until he could manage it on his
own when he just took off. He was like, OK,
now this is awesome. CAM LOCHHEAD: The
RADaptive Big Mountain Camp is a three day event. This is sort of the
one time of year that we all get to be together
and ski together again. Everybody’s got a story. Everybody’s been through
some pretty gnarly stuff in their life, and it seems
to build character in people. I mean, there’s this
camaraderie aspect to it that is just-it’s
unlike anything else. JEFF SCOTT: You
get to reminisce, talk about what you
want to ski tomorrow. It’s a big part of skiing
is apres and hanging out. NARRATOR: After a fun
night out on the town, the crew assembles up at the
mountain the next morning to begin camp. JEFF SCOTT: Let’s get
the skis up on the gondi and go get some turns. NARRATOR: With breathtaking
scenery in every direction, the crew gets a sense
of the wild big mountain terrain they’re bringing
themselves into. Ben Thompson, who’s
an athlete and also one of the coaches
at the camp, gives us an intro to the equipment. BEN THOMPSON: We just got to the
top of the Revelstoke gondola, and I just wanted to introduce
you to the sit ski parts. Let’s start from the bottom up. We’ve got a metal foot that
clips into a normal ski binding. We’ve got suspension
that makes taking all the bumps a lot easier. You have a big metal frame
to support all your weight. Different straps for
holding in your toes. Straps for holding in yourself. We’ve got different height
backs for different people. And then these are
the outriggers. It consists of a hand grip,
a piece on your forearm to help stabilize, and
then it’s about a two foot shaft with a small
ski on the end so that you can push
yourself around in the flats and make turns. JEFF SCOTT: We’ve got Odie
Pierce, heavy hitter coming out of the states. ODIE PIERCE: Back in Whitefish,
we do a lot of tree skiing. I lived in Jackson
Hole before that, and I was always told Revelstoke
was the spot to go, you know? MEGHAN LOCHHEAD: This mountain
is becoming more well known, but really it’s this
hidden gem of a mountain. These three lifts are taking
us into unreal terrain. ODIE PIERCE: I’ve done
a lot of ski camps, and this is really outstanding
what they’re doing here. NARRATOR: Our Community
will return after the break. We now return to Our Community. JEFF SCOTT: Day number one
of the RADaptive Sit Ski Camp we’re looking at
athletes and running them through a set of drills that are
essential in the big mountain world. NARRATOR: Last year’s contest
winner and sit ski Coach Cam Lochhead takes us
through a drill. CAM LOCHHEAD: Doing
something called [inaudible].. It’s just a drill that
gets you more reactive, so that when you get
into some sketchy stuff, you’ve kind of got it
in your back pocket. It’s essentially keeping
a really flat ski and making really, really
reactive quick turns with your ski while keeping
your outriggers facing down the hill. We’re going to do
falling leaf, just another kind of safety
mechanism if you’re in super sketchy steep terrain. NARRATOR: The athletes
are now getting a taste of what this world
class terrain entails. [music playing] Let’s go, go, go. Let’s go. JEFF SCOTT: It was great to see
the improvement in returning athletes, and the new
athlete, Odie Pierce, was awesome addition,
really pushed our group. Day two, the RADaptive Sit
Ski Camp in Revelstoke– we’re looking to
explore the mountain, check out some new terrain up
at the International Free Ski and Snowboard
Association’s contest. We are sitting
here in North Bowl. Had to come over
and take a look. CAM LOCHHEAD: So in front
of us, we’ve got a big face, and we’ve got some free
skiers coming down, walking off a few
cliffs on the way down. JEFF SCOTT: So we
wanted to come and see where the IFSA was
running their event and whether we could get
into the same entrance as them to potentially
partake in the contest. We’re not going to join
them, as access is more difficult than it needs to be. So after some of
the athletes saw the runs we were considering,
they had to go get some. So we sent a couple athletes
with some volunteers, and they went and skied some
of this big mountain terrain in North Bowl. [inaudible] want us to throw
some sit skiers in North Bowl, or what? CAM LOCHHEAD: Get out of the
covered zone and step it up. NARRATOR: The athletes drop
into a huge alpine bowl that works its way down
into the trees right beside the international
free ski competition, showing the crowd what
they can really do. JEFF SCOTT: Watching
some of our athletes ski North Bowl was pretty cool. CAM LOCHHEAD: Take it to the
next level-that’s always been the point of Live It Love It. JEFF SCOTT: It’s big terrain. It’s open. There are some
spicy sections where guys had to come in quick. Huge shout out to all
of our volunteers. This weekend I had two guys
skiing with me, both of who like to maybe get
a little sendy. WOMAN: [inaudible] MAN: Butter. NARRATOR: After an awesome
day on the mountain, the crew heads back to town
for some dinner and drinks. Jeff’s sister,
Lindsay, is approached by one of the locals. LINDSAY GERICKE: It’s so sick. MAN: So sick. MAN: Yeah. LINDSAY GERICKE: Last
night something really cool happened at dinner. We were all sitting together,
and this chick walks up, and she’s like, hey, were
you guys on the hill today? And a couple of us, yeah, yeah. And she’s like, I saw
you and I took a video. And it was so inspiring. I have a friend who’s been
injured just recently. He’s in the hospital. I took a video, and I sent it
to him, and it changed his day. And it moved him in a way
that he really needed. There’s this ripple
effect outside that is really, really special. CAM LOCHHEAD: I was able
to regain a part of myself, a piece of my identity
that I got back, which I felt like I had lost. At the end of the day, you’ve
got to keep living your life. For me, hugely important to
pursue my passions again, and that was sort of what was
able to sort of dig me out of a hole almost. It felt-first 8, 10
years of post injury I felt like I was in
a pretty crazy fog. LINDSAY GERICKE: When
Jeff first got hurt, I mean, we were more
terrified for his life and his livelihood, what
that would look like. But then as he
started to recover, it was just our belief,
whatever he wanted, we would find a way to make that
happen as a team, as a family, as a community. Finding a way to
be on snow was just a natural progression for
whenever he was ready, and even though he’s still
a snowboarder at heart– I think you’ll
hear him say that– I think sit skiing is as close
to that feeling and passion as he could ask for. We didn’t have a plan, but
we just did it anyways, and every step that you would
get to you kind of brainstorm and think, OK, how do we
overcome this obstacle? And then you would. If you look at the whole
mission, you’re kind of like, how are we going to do this? It seems impossible. You can’t have that attitude. It has to be just small
steps and just be there. Be part of it. Pretty soon you’ll look
back, and you’ll see, wow, we’ve done amazing things. JEFF SCOTT: It’s hard to
put into words how pumped am I to have my sister here. We grew up riding
together, and to have her here at this event– I looked over on one
of the runs today, and we were just carving. And it was a very
simple thing, but it felt like I was exactly
where I was supposed to be having her beside me. NARRATOR: Our Community
will return after the break. We now return to our community. JEFF SCOTT: Day three– you can feel energy
is apprehensive. Everyone knows we’ve
got the contest today, and we’ve got our run chosen. Athletes have skied it. We’ve got Jeff here today to
help us shape this big mountain contest. JEFF HOLDEN: My
name is Jeff Holden. I’m a judging director on
the International Free Skiers and Snowboarders Association. Doing a little judging
of their grass roots comp here on separate
reality in Revelstoke. JEFF SCOTT: We got the cat
ski trip as the top prize. We’re in the bottom of a bowl. We’ve got trees, some good open
areas, a couple little cliff bands, a lot of moguls. The conditions this year are
very intermittent, very crusty. You can hear people skiing down. BEN THOMPSON: It
might be a little hard to make any of that look good. JEFF SCOTT: The event
we’re at this weekend is all about pushing the
limits with sit skiing and getting them into
some big mountain terrain. NARRATOR: The athletes
session the terrain around the competition
area, pumping each other up as they cheer each other on
and push the limits of what’s possible on the run. Many of the riders have
abilities far beyond even well seasoned able-bodied athletes. To experience them having
full control on gnarly terrain is spectacular. MAN: Full since Sunday. CAM LOCHHEAD: I
think probably best to concentrate in the areas
that have had the most sun exposure at this point. BEN THOMPSON: We are at the
judging station for the contest going over a bit of the
terrain that we’re going to allow the athletes to ski. So the entrance you guys came
in on-if you cut across underneath the cliff
band over to that line Aaron’s looking at. LINDSAY GERICKE: Last year
we had some deeper snow, and it was easier to sort
of charge off some cliffs and do some steep stuff. And this year you
wouldn’t be doing that with these conditions. It’s just not safe or fun. NARRATOR: First up, last year’s
contest winner, Cam, drops in. Next, Ben Thompson and his
brother, Jeff, have a go. Next, RADaptive
athlete Aaron drops in with one of the best runs yet. Cam drops in on his
second and final run. Though he gets a little tripped
up on some unfortunate terrain, most of his run is flawless. Odie Pierce, the new
athlete from the States, drops in and totally
blows the crowd away. With alternative line choices,
some interesting drops, and rad little side
hits, he manages to find to top things off. [cheering] MAN: [inaudible] buddy. MAN: You! NARRATOR: The crew
lines up for their final runs as the contest
comes to a close. [cheering] MAN: Nicely done, buddy. MAN: That was all [inaudible]. NARRATOR: Our Community
we’ll return after the break. We now return to Our Community. Jeff skis up to the group to
reveal the contest results. JEFF SCOTT: With the
invite to the Mustang trip this year, 2019, Odie. [cheering] ODIE PIERCE: Right on. NARRATOR: Jeff Holden, the IFSA
star judge, also weighs in. JEFF HOLDEN: That was
pretty awesome to have couple events going
on here today, and hopefully we’ll keep working
together to bring them together in the future. We saw some good riding. Camaraderie was definitely high. ODIE PIERCE: Stoked to
see some new terrain and be up with all these guys. It was kind of through just
Facebook, social media. I’d never met
anybody at this camp. There’s not a single person
here that I’ve met before. So to have just drove
up from Whitefish, and just showed up,
and be totally welcome, and the only person here
for their first year and the only person from the
US I think is pretty sick. You know, if we can
get into something like the IFSA or the
Free Ride World Tour, maybe get some sponsors
for some riders, whether it be skis or
even full ride sponsors, it would be so cool to be
able to travel and just spread the word. JEFF SCOTT: These
burn through skis. Aaron saying he’s, I think– LINDSAY GERICKE:
35 or something. JEFF SCOTT: 35
days in the season, and he’s averaging a ski a day. ODIE PIERCE: To have
it side by side– truly side by side, like
ran at the exact same time at the exact same place
with able-bodied stuff, would just be so cool. I would definitely like to
get up there and at least for a couple of years
travel and do that. JEFF HOLDEN: I feel like
there is a lot of potential. ODIE PIERCE: My favourite run
today was probably the final run, because it’s the most vert
I’ve ever skied top to bottom. CAM LOCHHEAD: I’m going to
go ski out and hopefully hit the slush cup. JEFF SCOTT: We
got to the bottom, and there is a slush
cup waiting for us. Actually, I think it was a
first for everyone in a sit ski to hit a pond this big. NARRATOR: It’s an ongoing
mountain tradition to skim a slush
pond in the spring, and this year the crew
had their go at it. JEFF SCOTT: Yeah, everyone
got to skip across it. I dunked, but it happens. MAN: It was going really well
until my skis popped off. Both of them came off, and
I supermanned face first into the water, and I managed
to keep Jeff out of it for the most part. MAN: Try something. Just go and try it,
and you’d be surprised what some determination
can actually get you. MAN: Best part of the year. [chatter] CAM LOCHHEAD: I had a
really, really great time. I enjoyed the time. I think everybody else did. Made some connections, met
some really awesome people I’ll probably stay in touch with
for a really long time to come. JEFF SCOTT: We had Jeff Holden
helping us with the judging. We’ve got some
really big potential to turn this into a
world class competition. I’m not really sure what I’m
doing here with these events, but I feel like we’re
getting some traction. And we’re excited to be
knocking down barriers. LINDSAY GERICKE: My brother
wouldn’t admit it probably– he’s very humble– but watching how this camp
has sort of morphed and shaped over time it’s really become
this incredible community of people, and passion,
and snow sports. This camp and what it
does for other people– it’s life changing. ODIE PIERCE: Definitely props
to the Live It Love It guys. CAM LOCHHEAD: Jeff’s a super
infectious person, and, I mean, after you meet the guy,
he has-as you know, you want to be around the guy. He’s a pretty
amazing individual. MEGHAN LOCHHEAD: To be
able to rip down a ski hill like you used to– the more people there is
to just kind of bring up the energy level– it was so much fun. LINDSAY GERICKE: And the calibre
of athletes was so impressive, and I just admire
Jeff so much for that because he’s at the
heartbeat of it all, but he doesn’t even bat an eye. He’s just doing something
and creating something that he needs in his
life and that he loves, and it’s just kind
of ordinary for him. JEFF SCOTT: When I look around
and see some of the other guys at this event, smiles,
they’re hooting and hollering for each other. The Live It Love it Foundation
empowers through adventure and heals through community. If you’ve spent time
in the mountains and you’re wondering if you
can get back to the mountains, or you’ve never
explored the mountains and you think you
want to, I highly recommend touching base with
your local adaptive sports program. Find one near you. Talk to some folks
and experience it. LINDSAY GERICKE:
If you’re someone who loves skiing, and
loves snowboarding, loves being on the mountain, I
think volunteering and helping people re-achieve that part of
their life is really valuable. ODIE PIERCE: The
message I would say would be anything’s possible. MEGHAN LOCHHEAD: But everybody
is just stoked for each other. It makes him feel normal again. He’ll leave this,
and he’ll be in such a better mindset for weeks, or
months, or a year, you know? JEFF SCOTT: Growing up, I had
a pretty special childhood. Getting back to the mountains
now, riding alongside my sister is a pretty special feeling. MAN: There’s a lot of rain,
a lot of moisture out there, but our stoke pushed
it away, I guess. High pressure stoke system. JEFF SCOTT: I think the
future of adaptive skiing will slowly be included into
the full spectrum of skiing as we see it now. I think it’s OK to ask for help. That’s the biggest thing. ODIE PIERCE: Being
that I’ve gone to a lot of the big
mountains in the States, and this is right up there,
right with the best of any of the camps I’ve ever been to. And it totally
exceeded expectations. When you see them
on the hill, you see anybody sit skiier on the
hill, you get so much stoke. Everyone’s just so, so pumped. NARRATOR: Director–
Thomas Bowerbank. Producers-Jeff Scott,
Thomas Bowerbank. Assistant director–
Eric “Happy” Hanson. Director of photography–
Thomas Bowerbank. Additional cameras-Don
Nesbitt, Lindsay Gericke. Sound mixer-Dan Harden. Special thanks to
all the volunteers. Integrated described
video specialist– Em Williams. Regional content
specialist-Sylvi Fekete. Coordinating producer–
Jennifer Johnson. Director, production-Cara Nye. Director, programming–
Bryan Perdue. Vice president, programming
and production– John Melville. President and CEO– David Errington. Copyright 2019,
Accessible Media Inc.

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