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How to Swim Faster Butterfly

How to Swim Faster Butterfly


Voice of: Ken Wood
Body Position
The body position is really flat. And what we’re trying to do is eliminate almost any degree of lateral movement and very little in horizontal movement Jess Schipper
So that means that their breathing is done very low, and the recovery of the arms is very low. This involves head position, hip position and chest position. What we strive for is to breathe with her chin on the water, on the surface of the water, and the kick is a constant undulating kick which emanates from the rib cage and flows through down through the legs and through to the feet. It’s very similar to if you imagine a fish, the cartilages of the fish. They are very strong from the rear of the gills right through to the tail. And we’ve tried to emulate this with very little up-and-down movement especially in the recovery. And you’ll notice a slight space between her shoulders and the water surface of the water when she’s doing drills as in opposition to when she’s going at world-record pace where there’s no gap between the water and the shoulders and she’s reaching out long The entry is done with the thumbs slightly lower than the little finger. And when she reaches out when she enters the water, the hand immediately then feels for the water and stretches further under the water in a slight outward motion before commencing the first movement into the keyhole phase. That catch phase of the hands is done very relaxing so that she goes in probably just level with the shoulders. And then as she reaches out, the hands go in a little bit closer to the front before commencing the outward sweep into the keyhole position. We tried to develop what we call flat butterfly. And that means that we’re not lifting any excessive lift of the head or the shoulders in the recovery phase. In other words we’re not, we don’t want to expose any portion of the chest area to the water resistance. And so we’re recovering low with a constant undulating kick, working on the basis that fish don’t have any arms or legs, and we’re trying to get all the power that we can through the core body. Stephanie Rice
That means from the ribcage down through to the feet. We have done a lot of work on kick sets and underwater work. We swim much faster when we’re underwater. So I try, during the course of a butterfly race especially a two hundred fly, that the kick is undulating all the time emanating from the core body and flows through to the legs. But we’re trying to keep a constant move through the water emanating from the core body. And very similar to that is the cartilages of the fish as they go. And when we recover low, that enables her through virtue of the fact that she’s got core body strength. To be able to breathe low without any loss of velocity, the moment you bend your knees or you have to bend your knees to make a emphasis on a kick down. So that the flier has the feeling that they need that kick down not only to keep going forward but also to lift themselves out of the water to breathe. We don’t do that we emphasize that she can maintain momentum by use of the strength between the waist and the knees. The exit of the hands in the push phase of the stroke is by virtue of the fact that she’s breathing low and the keyholes, to be able to get a lot of strength into the recovery. And we really concentrate then when you’re pushing right back to let the water go at that precise moment. And the hands can swing around low over the water and in turn, as I said, with the thumb slightly lower than the little finger. Subscribe Now

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