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2014 AIG Winter Summit

2014 AIG Winter Summit


Red course. Robert [INAUDIBLE] for
[INAUDIBLE] [? covered to ?] team number 1 on the blue. [MUSIC PLAYING] Probably having
the daily functions of a normal life, grocery
shopping, putting on my shoes, accessibility, stairs obviously. Climbing stairs is
definitely not my forte. Getting up to go to
the bathroom at night. Consciously thinking
about how I look and how I’m going to
appear to other people. It’s waking up in
the morning, not being able to put two
feet on the floor. Getting the public
to understand that we as disabled Americans,
disabled human beings, are no different than they are. Sometimes it’s explaining to
people that you can’t always see what the disability is. Sometimes it just is. Yeah, like going through
security at the airport. They got to pat you down. They got to take the
swab on your leg. You got to have an
x-ray of it done. Is when I go to
CrossFit at the Y, but I’m working out, doing
sit ups and doing chin ups and jumping off boxes and
doing everything else. And then as I leave,
the 90-year-old woman that just came from
Pilates that runs to the door to open it for me. A lot of people when
you’re disabled, they want to do stuff for you. And it’s tough to tell
them, hey, I can do this. I can’t dance like
I used to maybe, but I couldn’t dance
in the first place. I think the toughest part for
me is people actually believing that I’m disabled. And getting girls, you know. It’s just not quite the same. I can’t quite pick up the
ladies with prosthetic legs. But if I jump up and down
enough, eventually I get them. Is being active. Sports. I love basketball. I love tennis. I love biking, like
mountain biking. Kayaking. I guess, water skiing. Golf. Swimming. Being outside in any
sport environment. Riding on a bicycle
in the countryside. Snowboarding. The one thing that lets me
forget about my disability is skiing. I would say skiing. Skiing. Skiing. Skiing. Strong, to be perfectly honest. It just gets me going. And it’s one of the reasons
I can be as happy as I am. It gives me a sense
that I’m not disabled. And it gives me just a great
deal of energy and relaxation at the same time. It makes me feel free again. I forget about it all
when I’m on the mountain. I might feel pain,
but there’s nothing that feels like it’s
going to stop me. Makes me feel at ease. I’m not thinking so much
about my disability. I’m not thinking about what
possible nightmare I could have had the night before. Free. Normal. Nothing holds me back out
here, except for ski patrol. But that’s OK. I love the speed. I love the beauty of it all. Being on the mountain makes
me feel like I’m alive again. You’re all alone. You’re your own person. It’s the alone time. And it empowers you. All in all, it’s just fun. It’s pure and simple fun. And I just enjoy it so much. The best part is
when you get off the lift at the top of the hill
and you might be fixing a glove or something and somebody
comes by you and asks you if you need help. And say, help with what? And they say, help
getting down the mountain. And then you pass them
in about five seconds, that’s probably the best part. It really shows
the deep commitment that the folks at AIG
have for our programs and because I get to be
with the Wounded Warriors. They’re like family. So AIG puts on this event to
get closer to its customers, to get closer to its
distribution partners, and it links to what we
do is our core business. And we love to see people
overcome their disability. And that’s just such a great
inspiration to all of us. I get to meet new people
and I get to positively reintegrate myself into
a sport that I love and as well as a new community. The camaraderie. It’s nice to be around people
who get it, who understand. This is just one
more building block of getting back
to what I consider a healthy, normal life. It’s always great
getting around a group of like-minded
individuals, people who’ve had a setback in the life
and now have the opportunity to overcome it and then exceed
what other people can do and over exceed
what they’ve thought they could do at one point. Without these events, I
don’t know what I would do. I would have to be
a ski bum somewhere. I’ve never done an event where
there was such participation from one company. And it’s great to
have everybody. It’s a massive amount
people and they’re all coming to support you. And really not just
to support you, you kind of feel
like royalty really. The amount of money that we
raise here is phenomenal. And it helps provide tremendous
support to Warfighter Sports. This event is a big reason
why I was able to go to Russia and represent my country
for the second time. It means controlling
your circumstances and not letting your
circumstances control you. Have fun with whatever
the day brings you. Enjoy it, push forward,
don’t let yourself be down, don’t let any obstacle or
hurdle that you wake up with that morning
reflect your entire day. Another opportunity
to get it right. Another opportunity to serve. Another opportunity to help
somebody realize their dreams. There’s always another day. And there’s always a chance to
get better at what you’re doing and push yourself even harder. There’s nothing that’s going
to stop me, today or tomorrow. Bring it on. I believe it gives you the
power to get through the day and look forward to having a
new day and a new opportunity. Having just got back from Sochi,
Russia, “Bring on Tomorrow” means that there’s about
1,400 days till Korea. “Bring on Tomorrow” really means
just whatever comes my way, whatever doors open, I just walk
right through it full force. Means commitment. Hope for the future. Give me your best shot
because I’m going to come back and I’m going to beat you. And what it does
“Bring on Tomorrow” mean to us here at AIG? It’s our belief in the
power of the human spirit, helping others when
they need it most, empowering them not only
to adapt but to overcome life’s challenges. Our kudos to the
athletes here who inspire us by pushing
themselves each day so they can realize a better tomorrow. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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